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Music

Below, are the current Stretch & Challenge activities for Music.


Year 7

  • Learn an instrument as part of Music maestros.
  • Explore the options for instrumental lessons and take up an instrument.
  • Audition for a school concert
  • Create a glossary of key terms and definitions that you have learned about in music lessons so far this year, that you can add to as you learn more.
  • Download a music notation game such as Staff Wars to help improve your knowledge of pitches in the treble, bass clef.
  • Create a piece of music by using loops with Soundation or Soundtrap online.
  • Write some of your own lyrics for a song using verse/chorus structure
  • Go to a concert of unfamiliar music – while you are there, note down 5 questions (about the musical style, the people performing, the instruments you hear being played or anything else you can think of) and then research the answers for yourself.

Recommended listening:

  • Fanfare for the Common Man by Copland  
  • A vous dirais Je, maman by WA Mozart
  • Enigma Variations by Elgar
  • Tango music by Astor Piazzolla
  • Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker/Waltz from Sleeping Beauty by Tchaikovsky
  • Disco music by artists such as the Bee Gees, Donna Summer or ABBA
     

    Year 8

  • Learn an instrument as part of Music maestros.
  • Join an extracurricular music group at school.
  • Audition for a school concert
  • Explore the options for individual instrumental lessons and take up an instrument.
  • Create a glossary of key terms and definitions that you have learned about in music lessons so far this year (and last), that you can add to as you learn more.
  • Choose your favourite scene from a film and have a go at writing a 5-mark answer to the following question: In what does the music create mood and/or tension in the scene? Your answer should refer to elements such as Dynamics, Rhythm & Metre, Structure, Melody, Instrumentation, Texture and Harmony.
  • Recreate your favourite pop song using sequencing software such as Soundation or Soundtrap online. Depending on your choice of song, this might include a bassline, chords, drum groove and vocals. It could also feature backing vocals. You may even choose to record the vocal yourself.
  • Using a piece of presentation software, (such as Powerpoint), create a presentation about the life and works of a film composer (such as Ennio Morricone, John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Thomas Newman, Michael Giacchino or Koji Kondo). You should include a brief summary of their musical education, their musical influences, audio examples of their work, and the reasons for their success. You might even plan to present for 5-10 minutes on the subject during a music lesson. 
  • Go to a concert of unfamiliar music – while you are there, note down 5 questions (about the musical style, the people performing, the instruments you hear being played or anything else you can think of) and then research the answers for yourself.

Recommended listening: 

  • Night on Bare Mountain by Mussorgsky
  • Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky
  • Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saens
  • Danse Macabre by Saint-Saens
  • Musicals by Rodgers & Hammerstein
  • West Side Story by Leonard Bernstein
  • Sweeney Todd by Stephen Sondheim
  • Les Miserables by Claude-Michel Schonberg
     

    Year 9
     

  • Join an extracurricular music group at school.
  • Explore the options for instrumental lessons and take up an instrument.
  • Form a covers band, rehearse a song and aim to perform in a Music lesson or in a school concert
  • Create a glossary of key terms and definitions that you have learned about in music lessons so far this year (and the last 2 years), that you can add to as you learn more.  
  • Begin a course of Music Theory, such as this one from musictehory.net
  • Create a quiz about key Italian terms and symbols used in Music. It should include a variety of question types (open questions, multiple choice, true or false, etc.) and cover content under headings such as Dynamics, Articulations, Tempo, Melodic Ornamentation, and Musical Character
  • Recreate one of the pop songs you have studied during the Popular Music topic using sequencing software such as Soundnation or Soundtrap online. Depending on your choice of song, this might include a bassline, chords, drum groove and vocals. It could also feature backing vocals. You may even choose to record the vocal yourself. Once you have done this, create a tutorial for the software you have used that would allow others to do the same.
  • Write your own 4-chord song, based on this template and perform it to friends and family. You could use notation software such as MuseScore, or create a lead sheet with lyrics annotated with chords.
  • Create, and share, a Spotify playlist that shows the developments in Popular Music between the 1950s and the present-day, including at least 2 songs from influential artists in each decade.
  • Go to a concert of unfamiliar music – while you are there, note down 5 questions (about the musical style, the people performing, the instruments you hear being played or anything else you can think of) and then research the answers for yourself.

    Recommended listening:
     
  • Symphony No. 9 (last movement) by Beethoven 
  • Romeo & Juliet Fantasy Overture by Tchaikovsky
  • Symphony No. 9 ‘From the New World’ (Largo) by Dvorak
  • Symphony No. 1 by Brahms
  • Film / computer game music by Ennio Morricone, John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Thomas Newman, Michael Giacchino, or Koji Kondo
  • Popular music between the 1950s and present-day from the following genres: Rock ‘n’ Roll, Motown, Progressive (‘Prog’) Rock, Disco, Hip-Hop, Synthpop/Europop, Indie/Alternative Rock, Britpop, Pop from the 2000s