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Pupil Premium

For a copy of our full Pupil Premium Report, please click here.

Context


Castle Rock High School is committed to narrowing attainment gaps between groups of students and ensuring that every student excels. The Pupil Premium funding is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged students and close the gap between them and their peers.

This funding is intended to benefit students on free school meals, children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months or have parents in the armed forces. The Government believes that the Pupil Premium funding, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way of ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.  The school gets a fixed sum of funding per student, for the academic year 2015/2016 this was £935 per student, £300 for children with parents in the armed forces and £1,900 for each student who has been looked after for more than 1 day or adopted from care.

Schools decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools per eligible pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.

Whilst schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium, they are held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low-income families. From September 2012, the government required schools to publish online information about how they have used, and are using, the Pupil Premium funding. This will ensure that parents and others are made fully aware of the attainment of pupils covered by the Premium.

At Castle Rock High School, Pupil Premium funding is used to implement specific educational interventions and additional academic support targeted at pupil premium students in an attempt to close the gap between pupil premium students and their non-pupil premium peers.  The Pupil Premium funding as a whole is dedicated to assist the learning process of students via high quality teaching provision, specific small group and one to one tuition, inclusions measures and interventions and detailed monitoring and analysis of data to evaluate progress, impact and value for money.
 

Internal Reviews
 

The Pupil Premium Action Group meets at the end of each review period (every six weeks).

Feedback from OFSTED – Nov 2012


“Disabled students and those who have special educational needs, those eligible for the pupil premium and the very few who speak English as an additional language make at least equal progress to their peers, and sometimes even better, as a result of the high-quality individual support, care and encouragement provided for them and the strong focus that the school places on raising self-esteem and promoting self-confidence.”

“The pupil premium funding is used to ensure that all students are fully included in all activities.  Alternative provision projects, such as the opportunity to work with professional sportsmen and performing artists, are also funded to raise self-esteem.  The funding has enabled the training of staff to deliver catch-up lessons in literacy and numeracy to close the gap between this group of students and their peers that was identified in 2012.”

“The governors have ensured that pupil premium funding is spent appropriately and carefully monitor the impact of this funding on achievement.”
 

External Review - Summer 2015


In the summer term of 2015 Castle Rock High School commissioned an external review of the pupil premium provision and use of funding.

Feedback from this review


“It is clear that the progress of its disadvantaged students is a key development priority for the school.  The senior leadership team has an extremely good awareness of its pupils and their specific needs and has implemented an impressive range of interventions to target Maths and English skills and to widen opportunity accordingly.  These are monitored extremely effectively, enabling the school to anticipate where they may need to intervene and to do so with notable impact on pupil learning.

The full report can be downloaded by clicking here.
 

Funding Information
 

Pupil Premium

Financial Year

Pupil Premium Funding Total No. of Pupil Premium Students Total % of students that are Pupil Premium Total No. of Students in School
2013-14 £149,610 135 27% 493
2014-15 £153,038 140 27% 520
2015-16 £144,000 167 31% 532
2016-17 £158,171 185 32% 571
2017-18 £162,000 175 30% 575


Year 7 Catch Up

Financial Year Year 7 Catch Up Funding Total No. of Yr 7 Catch Up Students Total % of Yr 7 Students that are Yr 7 Catch Up Total No. of Students in Yr 7
2014-15 £25,500 45 22.5% 200
2015-16 £16,500 26 14% 184
2016-17 £18,178 69 students scored below 100 in either English or Maths or both 35% 195
2017-18 £18,360 54 students scored below 100 in either English or Maths or both 27% 197

 

Pupil Premium 2016-17 - £158,171


Key Strategies for 'Narrowing the Gap' 2016-2017 - For detailed chart including impact information, please click here.

Pupil Premium Used For: Cost of Strategy

Whole school focus on developing the quality of Marking and Feedback, as highlighted on School Improvement plan.

£1,500

Smaller class sizes across the curriculum. Pupils being streamed into 7 sets instead of 6.

N/A
Continuation of the development and implementation of a whole school monitoring system which enables specific data analysis of pupil premium/disadvantaged students ensuring appropriate additional testing and signposting of appropriate interventions. External evaluation of pupil premium/disadvantaged student provision, data and interventions. £6,749

Contribution to the TLRs for two new positions within the school. One to lead on strategies to support Pupil Premium students and one to lead on strategies to support boys across the school.

£2,476
Contribution to the salary of the Parental Engagement Lead Practitioner to develop parental engagement and to lead in the transition process including the organisation of the summer school for eligible pupil premium students to enhance transition from KS2 to KS3. £22,000
Contribution to the salary of Attendance Officer, employed in partnership with the ACE Partnership to support good attendance. £3,800

Contribution to the salary of Academic Mentors to provide intervention in order to ensure students make at least expected progress.

£39,563
Introduction of Peer Tuition in Numeracy and Peer Reading Scheme. £1,500
Alternative curriculum both in school through the development of the Outdoor Learning intervention and external specialists to deliver interventions that have a positive impact upon student attainment. These interventions have a strong focus on numeracy and literacy throughout their activities/tasks with students signposted via internal monitoring and student data analysis. £15,000
To provide additional, quality classroom support and interventions by teaching staff and trained support staff. A 6 weekly review period highlights students who are underachieving within 2 or more. £55,254
A proportion of the cost of the Personal Challenge Project for year 7s and Music Maestro Project for year 8s and 9s to ensure monitoring of attendance and removal of barriers for future attendance for pupil premium students along with transport provision assistance. £9,500

Allocation for contributions towards uniform purchase, additional curriculum initiatives, subsidising school trips and other additional expenditure.

£10,000

Introduction of Year 9 Master Classes.

£9,920

When taking into consideration the total funding available, the school will input additional funding to carry out the planned strategies over the academic year (2016-2017).
 

Pupil Premium 2017-2018 - £162,000


Planned Key Strategies for 'Narrowing the Gap' 2017-2018 - For detailed chart including planned impact information, please click here.

Pupil Premium Used For: Cost of Strategy

Subject teachers having timetabled lessons for intervention in English and Maths. Working with the Year 7 Catch up students and Pupil Premium students.

TBC

Contribution to the salary of the Parental Engagement Lead Practitioner to develop 1-2-1 sessions with PP students and the devising of one page profiles and to further enhance parental links through evening and daytime drop in sessions and parent forums.

TBC
Contribution to the salary of Attendance Officer, employed in partnership with the ACE Partnership to support good attendance. TBC
Alternative curriculum both in school through the development of the Outdoor Learning intervention and external specialists to deliver interventions that have a positive impact upon student attainment. These interventions have a strong focus on numeracy and literacy throughout their activities/tasks with students signposted via internal monitoring and student data analysis. TBC

To provide additional, quality classroom support and interventions by teaching staff and trained support staff. A 6 weekly review period highlights students who are underachieving within 2 or more subjects, these students are signposted to small group and 1-2-1 intervention work within relevant subjects.

TBC
A proportion of the cost of the Personal Challenge Project for year 7s and Music Maestro Project for year 8s and 9s to ensure monitoring of attendance and removal of barriers for future attendance for pupil premium students along with transport provision assistance. TBC
Provision of breakfast club and twilight club to raise attainment through concentration and support within key curriculum areas. TBC
Allocation for contributions towards uniform purchase, additional curriculum initiatives, subsidising school trips and other additional expenditure. TBC

For detailed chart including Impact information, click here.
 

Summer School Funding


For academic year 2015/2016 the DFE withdrew the Summer School Funding.  Castle Rock reviewed data relating to previous summer school sessions and agreed to continue to run the Summer School despite withdrawal of the funding to continue enhancing transition for students attending the sessions.

During 2014/2015 we successfully obtained funding to run a 10 day Summer School for Year 6 Pupil Premium students during the summer holiday with the focus on preparing eligible new pupils for the transition to secondary school and maintaining/refreshing their literacy and numeracy skills.

The funding provided is £250 for a one week or £500 for a two week summer school per pupil.  We received £25,000 for this project. The school is informed of eligible students via the Ever 6 register and students are formally invited to attend. The summer school is staff by current teaching and support staff which provides the opportunity for the students to get to know staff prior to commencing school in September aiding their first few weeks. Various activities are held within the two weeks ranging from sports activities, creative design, drama workshops, cookery, outdoor learning, archery and journal development.

Positive feedback was received from both students and parents stating that the students felt more confident about starting at Castle Rock and had already started to form new friendships and socialise with different groups of people. The continued support and initiatives implemented during the first week of term enabled students to continue with their positive transition, building on relationships already established with staff and enabled a more confident start to the new academic year. The summer school allowed parents the opportunity to liaise with members of staff and this allowed the parents to feel more comfortable with their child starting secondary school.

Most recently, the roles and responsibilities of our Care and Guidance team have been reviewed and as a result a Summer School is being planned and will run in the Summer of 2018, funded by the school.


Whole School Attendance


Attendance 2016-17

  School Pupil Premium Attendance School Non Pupil Premium Attendance Difference between School PP and School Non PP
Year 7 95.23% 97.21% -1.98%
Year 8 93.04% 95.54% -2.50%
Year 9 93.61% 95.26% -1.65%
Whole School 94.05% 95.96% -1.91%

 

  National Disadvantaged* Attendance National Non Disadvantaged Attendance Difference between National Disadvantaged and National Non Disadvantaged
National 2014-15 92.50% 95.70% -3.2%

* National Disadvantaged data is FSM + Ever Six


Whole School Attendance

  Pupil Premium Attendance Non Pupil Premium Attendance Difference
2016-17 94.05% 95.96% -1.91%
2015-16 94.16% 96.22% -2.06%
2014-15 92.91% 96.53% -3.62%
2013-14 93.42% 96.43% -3.1%

For further information on behaviour and attendance, including exclusion data, please click here.

Analysis of Student Progress


Expected Progress from KS2

The following tables indicate the percentage of students making expected progress. An appendix to this report shows our transition matrices from which this data is taken.

National data on progress and attainment at the end of Key Stage 3 is not available. Therefore, the school follows a methodology developed within the ACE Partnership which replicates the KS4 Raiseonline/inspection dashboard approach. Taking 3 levels of progress as expected progress from KS2 to 4, and 4 levels progress as more than expected, this methodology expects 9/14 of this progress during Key Stage 3 (being 9 terms of the total 14 terms over Key Stages 3 and 4 that students experience before taking GCSE examinations.)

For the next academic year (as we move away from KS3 levels and move from GCSE grades to numbers), a ‘best fit’ approach will be used using National Transition Matrices. Expected progress will be worked out using the National Transition Matrices, taking in to account students individual KS2 result and the students Current Pathway which highlights the GCSE result they are most on track to achieve.

This approach will be reviewed for 2017 by which time ACE Partnership schools will have introduced a Key Stage 3 Progress 8 measure.

Year 9

  % Achieving Expected Progress
  School Summer 2017 National 2015 Difference
English (All) 78 69 9
English (PP) 72 57 15
English (Non PP) 78 74 4
 
School PP vs National Non PP -2
 
Maths (All) 80 66 14
Maths (PP) 74 49 25
Maths (Non PP) 83 72 11
 
School PP vs National Non PP 2


Year 8

  % Achieving Expected Progress
  School Summer 2017 National 2015 Difference
English (All) 85 69 16
English (PP) 85 57 28
English (Non PP) 85 74 11
 
School PP vs National Non PP 11
 
Maths (All) 77 66 11
Maths (PP) 71 49 22
Maths (Non PP) 80 72 8
 
School PP vs National Non PP -1


Year 7

  % Achieving Expected Progress
  School Summer 2017 National 2015 Difference
English (All) 78 69 9
English (PP) 71 57 14
English (Non PP) 82 74 8
 
School PP vs National Non PP -3
 
Maths (All) 80 66 14
Maths (PP) 71 49 22
Maths (Non PP) 85 72 13
 
School PP vs National Non PP -1

 

This indicates that in both English and Maths, the percentage of Pupil Premium student’s making ‘expected progress’ was above the national figures for Pupil Premium students.

However, when comparing Pupil Premium students to the national figures for All students, there is still a slight gap the school needs to close (with the exception of Year 8 English 2017). It is worth noting that in order to close the gap between School Pupil Premium and National Non-Pupil Premium, it would only have taken 2 more Pupil Premium students to have made expected progress.

This gap goes against recent school trends e.g. for 2015 and 2016 where the gap had closed. However, this is not comparing like for like, as 2016 and 2015 used National Curriculum Levels, whilst in 2017 students were assessed against the ACE Partnerships Pathway model. We believe the gap in 2017 is mainly due to the changes in assessment at Key Stage 3 and ‘life after levels.’ The data for 2017 is based on the Pathway assessment model which was devised by the ACE Partnership and challenges students to meet the higher levels.

Due to the high progress made by Non-Pupil Premium students within the school, there are in school gaps between Pupil Premium and Non-Pupil Premium that we are working to close.

Attainment

The following charts show a 4 year trend in attainment – highlighting the % of Pupil Premium and Non Pupil Premium students achieving a Level 5 or above by the end of Key Stage 3. Data for Level 5 does not exist due to the changes in assessment at Key Stage 3.

In terms of attainment, the in school gap between Pupil Premium and Non Pupil Premium achieving a Level 5 or above in English had narrowed over the past three years, and narrowed even further in 2016. The in school gap between Pupil Premium and Non Pupil Premium achieving a Level 5 or above in Maths had narrowed over the past three years, but widened in 2016.